Activity Number
271
Editable
Overview and Learning Objectives
Assessment
Central Concepts
Benchmarks and Standards
Extensions and Connections
Activity Credits

X-ray Crystallography (a 13-page activity for advanced students)

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Overview and Learning Objectives

This activity introduces the fundamental principles of X-ray crystallography, and guides students through a series of activities for learning how structural information can be derived from X-ray diffraction patterns.

Students will be able to:

  • describe what can be detected with X-ray crystallography, proteins in particular;
  • explain the impact of temperature, atom size, and impurities on the tests.

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Assessment

Test

http://www.concord.org/~barbara/workbench_web/pdf/X-Ray_Crystal_Assess.8.pdf

Rubric

http://www.concord.org/~barbara/workbench_web/pdf/X-Ray_Crystal_Rubric.8.07.pdf

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Central Concepts

Key Concept:

Additional Related Concepts

Physics/Chemistry

  • Crystal
  • Defraction

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Benchmarks and Standards

AAAS

  • THE PHYSICAL SETTING: THE STRUCTURE OF MATTER - Atoms often join with one another in various combinations in distinct molecules or in repeating three-dimensional crystal patterns (Full Text of Standard)

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Extensions and Connections

http://ice.chem.wisc.edu/catalogitems/ScienceKits.htm

"The DNA Optical Transform Kit uses a visible laser and two-dimensional patterns to simulate Rosalind Franklin's famous x-ray diffraction experiments that led to the discovery of the DNA double helix."

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Activity Credits

Created by CC: Molecular Literacy using Molecular Workbench

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NSF Logo
These materials are based upon work supported
by the National Science Foundation under grant numbers
9980620, ESI-0242701, EIA-0219345, DUE-0402553, and 0628181.

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this
material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect
the views of the National Science Foundation.